The Trump administration’s rollback of mileage standards Tuesday marks a win for Americans who like their SUVs and pickup trucks, but the government’s own estimates show big costs, too — more Americans dying from air pollution, more climate-damaging exhaust and more expense for drivers at gas pumps.

The administration’s final rule eases future mileage standards for years to come, gutting tougher Obama-era standards that were the U.S. government’s single most forceful initiative against climate-changing fossil fuel emissions.

“Great news! American families will now be able to buy safer, more affordable, and environmentally friendly cars with our new SAFE VEHICLES RULE,” President Trump declared in a tweet. “Get rid of those old, unsafe clunkers. Build better and safer American cars and create American jobs. Buy American!”

However, Democratic lawmakers and environmental groups condemned the rollback, and years of legal battles are expected, including from California and other states opposed to it.

The rollback drew rare public criticism from former President Barack Obama.

“We’ve seen all too terribly the consequences of those who denied warnings of a pandemic. We can’t afford any more consequences of climate denial,” Obama tweeted after Trump’s transportation and Environmental Protection Agency heads made the final rule public.

Trump’s new mileage standards require automakers to achieve 1.5% annual increases in fuel efficiency. The Obama-era standards called for 5% annual increases.

“This rule supports our economy and the safety of American families,” said EPA chief Andrew Wheeler.

James Owens, acting administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said the rule will ensure that more people can buy new vehicles.

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Marriott says guests’ names, loyalty account information and other personal details may have been accessed in the second major data breach to hit the company in less than two years.

Marriott said Tuesday that approximately 5.2 million guests worldwide may have been affected. The data taken may have included names, addresses, phone numbers, birthdays, loyalty information for linked companies such as airlines and room preferences. Marriott said it’s still investigating but that it doesn’t believe credit card information, passport numbers or driver’s license information were accessed.

In November 2018, Marriott announced a massive data breach in which hackers accessed information on as many as 383 million guests. In that case, Marriott said unencrypted passport numbers for at least 5.25 million guests were accessed, as well as credit card information for 8.6 million guests. The affected hotel brands were operated by Starwood before it was acquired by Marriott in 2016.

The FBI led the investigation of that data theft, and investigators suspected the hackers were working on behalf of the Chinese Ministry of State Security.

Marriott said Tuesday that it had informed guests of the new data breach. The Bethesda, Maryland-based company is offering affected guests free enrollment in a personal information monitoring service for up to one year.

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