An online survey offers the chance to weigh in on what is most essential to the character of Teton County and how to preserve the community’s heritage.

The survey created by Boulder, Colorado, consultants Winter and Company seeks public input on revamping weak and outdated regulations for the Town Square.

The process also will draw up broader regulations to promote historic preservation throughout Teton County.

With few mechanisms in place to guard Jackson Hole’s heritage and no concrete stylistic philosophy to guide future development, officials want to strengthen their strategies on both fronts.

In pleasant contrast to most planning and zoning, the discussion remains within the realm of comprehension for the average resident. It’s often as simple as looking at photographs of buildings and determining whether they reflect the Jackson Hole ideal.

“You don’t have to be a planning guru or someone who’s read from front cover to back cover everything we’ve produced,” Town of Jackson Principal Planner Paul Anthony said. “This is one that everyone really can show up to and participate.”

The survey, available through Aug. 14, takes about 20 minutes or more, depending on whether participants provide written comments.

It starts by asking participants to name three historic “resources and/or areas” in both the town and county. It also asks for an explanation of why they are historic. They may, for example, represent a historic style — like log cabins — or they may be associated with an important person or event.

Then the survey moves into images of buildings and public areas around Teton County, from Jackson Drug to the Town Square to various A-frames, bungalows and other building styles. Participants are asked to rank the importance of preserving such places.

Another set of images, some from Jackson and some not, are provided to determine what kind of construction should be allowed in and immediately around the Town Square. Still more photos ask the same question of public spaces like sidewalks, parks and other pedestrian areas.

The official Town Square zone is divided into an inner and outer region, dubbed districts 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. The notable distinction is that buildings in the inner zone can be up to only two stories, and in the outer zone they can be three. But that, along with the physical boundaries of the Town Square zones, remains subject to change.

In another section, a series of illustrations show various building heights and ask whether they should be allowed in the inner and outer Town Square. They range from one to three stories, with multiple design options for the taller buildings to offset their magnitude.

The survey mirrors two workshops the town held in June, where groups of interested citizens ran through basically the same exercises. Responses to the survey will build on those workshops, and Winter and Company hopes to present its recommendations in a second round of workshops in late September or early October.

For information and a link to the Historic Preservation and Town Square Zoning survey, go to jacksontetonplan.com.

Contact Cody Cottier at 732-5911 or town@jhnewsandguide.com.

Cody Cottier covers town and state government. He grew up with a view of the Olympic Mountains, and after graduating Washington State University he traded it for a view of the Tetons. Odds are the mountains are where you’ll find him when not on deadline.

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