Cicadas were flying; for hours, Biden's press plane was not

A shell of a Brood X cicada is seen on a tree on the North Lawn of the White House in Washington on Tuesday. Reporters traveling to the United Kingdom ahead of Biden’s first overseas trip were delayed seven hours after their chartered plane was overrun by cicadas.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The cicadas were flying. The reporters hoping to join the president in Europe were not.

Reporters traveling to the United Kingdom to cover President Biden’s first overseas trip were delayed seven hours after their chartered plane was overrun by cicadas.

The Washington, D.C., area is among the many parts of the United States that have been swarmed by Brood X cicadas, a large emergence of the loud 17-year insects that sometimes take to dive-bombing moving vehicles and unsuspecting passersby. There are trillions of them in the Washington, Maryland and Virginia region, said University of Maryland entomologist Paula Shrewsbury.

Even Biden wasn’t spared. The president brushed a cicada from the back of his neck as he chatted with his Air Force greeter after arriving at Joint Base Andrews for Wednesday’s flight.

“Watch out for the cicadas,” Biden then told reporters. “I just got one. It just got me.”

The bugs also tried to stow away on Air Force Two on Sunday when Vice President Kamala Harris flew to Guatemala. The cicadas were caught hiding in folds of the shirts of a Secret Service agent and a photographer, and were escorted off the plane before takeoff.

It was unclear how cicadas disrupted the mechanics of the press plane. Weather and crew rest issues also contributed to the flight delay late Tuesday. Ultimately, the plane was swapped for another one, and the flight took off shortly after 4 a.m. Wednesday.

“We’ll, why wouldn’t the cicadas want to go to the U.K. with the president of the United States?” asked University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp. Periodic cicadas mostly inhabit the United States, with two tiny exceptions in Asia. They are not in Europe.

The press plane is arranged with the assistance of the White House and carries journalists at their expense.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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