139-year-old house rolls to new San Francisco address

Workers pass a Victorian home as a truck pulls it through San Francisco on Sunday. The house, built in 1882, was moved to a new location about six blocks away to make room for a condominium development. According to the consultant overseeing the project, the move cost approximately $400,000 and involved removing street lights, parking meters and utility lines.

After 139 years at 807 Franklin Street in San Francisco, a two-story Victorian house has a new address.

The green-painted home with large windows and a brown front door was loaded onto giant dollies and moved Sunday to a location six blocks away.

Onlookers lined the sidewalks to snap photos as the structure rolled — at a top speed of 1 mph — to 635 Fulton Street.

The house’s journey has been in the planning stages for years, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Veteran house mover Phil Joy told the newspaper he had to secure permits from more than 15 city agencies. Joy said this move was tricky in part because the first leg of the journey involved going downhill.

“That’s always difficult for a house,” he said.

Along the route, parking meters were ripped up, tree limbs were trimmed and traffic signs were relocated.

The owner of the six-bedroom house, San Francisco broker Tim Brown, will pay about $400,000 in fees and moving costs, the Chronicle said.

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Customs authorities in Ohio say they intercepted a shipment of cereal earlier this month with a special frosting — cocaine.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Cincinnati reported finding 44 pounds of cocaine-coated cornflakes that had been shipped from South America to a Hong Kong home.

Officials said a narcotics detection dog named Bico was checking out incoming freight from Peru on Feb. 13 when he alerted officers to the package. Officers found that the cereal contained white powder and the flakes were coated with a grayish substance. Both tested positive for cocaine.

Cincinnati Port Director Richard Gillespie said smugglers will try to hide narcotics in anything imaginable but vowed that inspectors will “use their training, intuition and strategic skills” to stop such shipments.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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