Republican Liz Cheney and Democrat Lynette Grey Bull are competing to represent Wyoming in the U.S. House of Representatives. Read more about them and their positions here. — Billy Arnold

Liz Cheney

Liz Cheney

LIZ CHENEY

Party: Republican

Years living in Wyoming: I moved back home 8 years ago.

Age: 54

Lives in: Teton County

What is or was your occupation, and how has it prepared you to represent Wyoming in the U.S. Senate?

I am honored to be Wyoming’s lone representative in the U.S. House of Representatives. I serve as the 3rd ranking member of the House Republican Conference and sit on both the House Armed Services Committee and Natural Resources Committee.

Why are you running for federal office?

Election 2020 Logo

I'm a proud constitutional conservative with a track record of championing free markets, restoring our liberties, securing our country, and defending our constitutional rights. I have worked with the President to cut burdensome red tape and onerous Obama-era regulations and to defend our constitutional rights. I have been a tireless advocate for Wyoming families and our key industries, including ag, energy and tourism, working to protect us from one-size fits all policy handed down from Washington, DC. Today, we are facing many unprecedented challenges, and some in Congress who believe America should be a socialist nation. I will never let that happen, and I will work every day to stop those who want to take power away from individuals and give it to the federal government. Wyoming only has one seat in the U.S. House and we must ensure we have the strongest voice possible representing us.

Do you support another federal coronavirus relief package? 

Yes. The CARES Act provided critical relief to Wyoming, our health care providers, tribes, schools, small businesses and ranchers. While funding in CARES was a necessary response to the public health emergency, any future relief package must be fiscally responsible and specifically tailored to the families and businesses struggling to recover from the pandemic. Unfortunately, the legislation proposed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi was nothing more than an irresponsible partisan wish list that would have done nothing to rebuild our economy, get people back to work and keep kids back in school. I am hopeful that we can come to an agreement that would allow our small businesses to access additional Paycheck Protection Program money, give the state more time and flexibility to use CARES Act funding, and provide additional support to Wyoming energy producers.

Rank the top three most pressing issues facing Wyoming.

1. COVID-19

2. Economy

3. The Chinese Communist Party. The CCP is targeting communities in Wyoming and across America in an effort to undermine our nation. We are seeing the effects of the CCP’s policies every day as our state confronts coronavirus, a pandemic that China unleashed on the world with its lies and deception. The CCP has infiltrated our telecommunications networks with equipment provided by Huawei, a company controlled by the Chinese Communist Party. China also strategically dominates the global supply chain for rare earth minerals, which are critical for defense, computers, cars, and more. Fortunately, Wyoming is blessed to have rare earth deposits and is working to rebuild America’s capacity to mine and process them. The CCP also dominates the supply chain for critical medicines that affect our everyday lives, such as ibuprofen and antibiotics. Recently, the Chinese government even threatened to withhold critical medicines from the United States. In addition, across America, the CCP is infiltrating U.S. universities, research centers, businesses, and more in an effort to steal intellectual property that is critical for American prosperity and security. The CCP’s hostile efforts affect everyone in Wyoming and across our great nation, and it is our duty to counter them.

How big of an issue is climate change for Wyoming?

Unfortunately, some are using the devastating fires ravaging the west as a platform to impose dangerous new climate policies. Instead of being quick to issue heavy-handed regulations on our fossil fuel and manufacturing industries, we need to be responsible for activities like forestry management. Our forests are full of overly dense vegetation and deadfalls caused by beetle kill that sets the stage for fueling out-of-control catastrophic forest fires. We will reduce the number of fires nationwide once we properly manage our forest as intended by our United States Forest Service. I welcome a debate on climate change, but will not ignore the real reason for the issues plaguing our state.

What, if anything, should be done to reform the campaign finance system in the U.S.? Why?

I will never support any campaign finance reform that would pose a dangerous assault on free speech which is exactly what House Democrats put before this Congress. I opposed H.R.1 because it would create a system that allows the federal government to dictate what Americans can and can’t say, and funnels taxpayer money into the congressional campaign process.

Is the immigration system broken in the U.S.? Please explain how or why it should be fixed or left as is.

Yes, our immigration system is broken and we must fix it, including by securing our borders. America is a nation of immigrants and we should welcome those who come here legally in pursuit of the American Dream. But for too long, our porous borders have contributed to the flow of criminal activity into our communities and flooded our streets with illegal drugs. President Trump has taken decisive action, working with our Central and South American allies, to secure our borders. Additionally, we must fix our legal immigration system so it does not take jobs away from American citizens and is responsive to the needs of Wyoming businesses such as hotels, restaurants, farms, and ranches.

What would be your approach to federal oversight of policing, crime and racial injustice — major themes in this year’s election?

I stand with law enforcement and first responders who put their lives on the line for us all. House Democrats pursued partisan legislation they knew would not be signed into law instead of working across the aisle on common sense reforms that would lead to solutions. The Justice Act drafted by Sen. Tim Scott which I cosponsored included reforms to support police across the country in training, accountability and transparency. The murder of George Floyd sparked constitutionally-protected peaceful protests across the country, but, sadly, unlawful riots soon took over. Those who exploited the protests, attacked law enforcement, burned our cities and assaulted innocent civilians then attempted to erase our history. We must have safe, secure communities, and we need to live up to the values laid out in our founding documents — not tear down our founding fathers. I will always honor the contributions of those who preceded us and stand up for our history, our values and the unique greatness of our country.

LYNNETTE GREY BULL

Years living in Wyoming: 3

Age: 43

Lives in: Wind River Reservation / Fremont County

What is or was your occupation, and how has it prepared you to represent Wyoming in the U.S. Senate?

I am the director of the Wind River/Department of Interior Land Buyback Program for Tribal Nations, a $2 billion federal program created so tribal members with broken up land parcels can be fairly compensated for those unusable land parcels. Throughout my life I've served in positions that share the same undertones: the need for strong leadership, and working towards a goal that was bigger than those in my office--a goal that served the community and the people in it.

Why are you running for federal office?

N/A — There was a technical glitch when Lynette Grey Bull responded to this question. Her answer should be coming soon.

Do you support another federal coronavirus relief package? 

Yes. New COVID relief legislation must addresses people’s true needs: expanded unemployment assistance, student loan relief, eviction and foreclosure pauses while also assisting landlords whose renters have been affected, protecting our small businesses, and investing in online education infrastructure and programs to keep our students and teachers safe.

Rank the top three most pressing issues facing Wyoming.

1. COVID-19

2. Economy

3. Climate change

How big of an issue is climate change for Wyoming?

N/A — There was a technical glitch when Lynette Grey Bull responded to this question. Her answer should be coming soon.

What, if anything, should be done to reform the campaign finance system in the U.S.? Why?

Our campaign finance system allows essentially unlimited spending, favors those who have access to large donors and all but requires candidates spend as much time fundraising as they do talking to voters. We need to move to a system that doesn’t disqualify the working class from seeking office and participating in their government.

Is the immigration system broken in the U.S.? Please explain how or why it should be fixed or left as is.

N/A — There was a technical glitch when Lynette Grey Bull responded to this question. Her answer should be coming soon.

What would be your approach to federal oversight of policing, crime and racial injustice — major themes in this year’s election?

I favor a community-oriented policing model, which by its nature requires that the community dictate the needs, budget and spending of a law enforcement organization. Communities need the flexibility to address their local concerns. I would support training requirements that center around racial bias, diversity, deescalation techniques, and a use of force model that requires a proportional response to a conflict.

What else should voters know?

What I've always believed is that life is about people, about helping people. At our funeral, no one talks about how much money we made, they talk about the person we are. I want to be remembered as a person who always helped the people as much as they were able to. Still today I'm delivering food boxes, advocating for Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW), doing everything I can to make a difference.

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