Campfire ban

Firefighter Ron Steffens walks along the perimeter of the Antelope Fire in June 2014, which was believed to have been caused by an abandoned campfire.

Teton Interagency fire managers yesterday elevated the fire danger rating to high for Grand Teton National Park, the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the National Elk Refuge and urged people to use caution with flames.

“High” danger means fires can start and spread quickly. The rating is based on, among other things, the moisture content of vegetation and projected weather.

“Public land users can help prevent wildfires by not having a fire at all and instead dressing for success with layers and warm clothes,” a press release said.

In areas where campfires are allowed, campers, hunters and other recreationists should never leave them unattended and must completely extinguish them before leaving.

So far this year there have been more than 155 illegal and abandoned campfires in the Teton Interagency Fire area.

“Unattended or abandoned campfires and warming fires can quickly escalate into wildfires, and recreationists can be held liable for suppression costs if their campfire becomes a wildfire,” the release said.

“All campers and day users should have a shovel on hand and a water bucket ready for use if choosing to have a fire,” it said. “Soak, stir, feel, repeat. It is extremely important that all campfires are ‘dead out’ and cold to the touch before leaving.”

Contact Jennifer Dorsey at jennifer@jhnewsandguide.com or 732-5908.

Jennifer Dorsey is chief copy editor for the News&Guide and one of the editors for local articles printed in the Jackson Hole Daily.

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