Victory Gardens

The Jackson Hole Community Garden in 2017. The University of Idaho's Teton County, Idaho extension is offering a free online class about planting your own victory garden. Course materials will be available until December.

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Heads up. Gardening is still a go.

If you want to get your green thumb going, the University of Idaho's Teton County, Idaho, extension is offering a victory garden course for free online. 

The term "victory garden" came to prominence during World War I and World War II, when people were encouraged to plant gardens to supplement their food supply and boost their morale.

The university's program was created in 2008 — you may remember the Great Recession happening then — for a similar reason: helping communities grow their own fruits and vegetables during challenging times.

There is no registration required and no fee. Course material, which includes 10 online sessions, handouts and readings, will be available until December.

Jennifer Werlin, the Teton County extension's community food systems educator, said she plans to teach a version of the course tailored for high altitude environments next spring. 

In the meantime, the online course can be accessed here.

Questions and comments can be emailed to Ariel Agenbroad at ariel@uidaho.edu.

Contact Billy Arnold at 732-7063 or barnold@jhnewsandguide.com.

Teton County Reporter

Previously the Scene editor, Billy Arnold made the switch to the county beat where he's interested in exploring Teton County as a model for the rest of the West. When he can, he still writes about art, music and whatever else suits his fancy.

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