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If you’ve ever been in a conversation with me that has lasted over 15 minutes — about any topic: politics, relationships, gossip, whatever — I probably at some point injected: “Have you ever read Sapiens?”

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According to the 2019 The Infinite Dial study by Edison Research, more than half of the U.S. population has listened to a podcast. That is a remarkable statistic for a media form that many people hadn’t heard of a decade ago and wasn’t invented until 2004.

The Hole Scroll
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Noso Patches has only been around since 2016, but the company has made a big splash beyond just Jackson Hole. The creative nylon puffy patches have been reviewed in Outside, Misadventures and Outdoor Insight.

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With the third confirmed case of coronavirus in Teton County and the first “shelter in place” orders rolling out in places such as California and Texas, more and more valley residents are cooped up at home.

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As the snow recedes off south-facing buttes and low-lying flats, Indian potatoes and sagebrush buttercups are starting to bloom. While the human residents of Jackson Hole are isolated and distressed, the ecological processes of spring are proceeding as normal, unaware of our plight.

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Two weeks after the grand opening for Shari Brownfield Fine Art’s new gallery space in a historic cabin downtown, COVID-19 forced the gallery to close. Brownfield began isolating with her daughter and, because she never stops thinking about art, formulating the theme of a new exhibition.

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In the Epitaph to “A Streetcar Named Desire,” Tennessee Williams quotes the fifth stanza of “The Broken Tower,” a 1932 poem by Hart Crane, a modernist poet whose struggles with depression, addiction and his own sexuality may have been prophetic of what was to come for Williams.

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The Lahaina Banyan is one of the largest trees in the United States. Its canopy stretches out over a quarter mile, overshadowing the grounds of a 1854 courthouse in Maui, Hawaii. Up close the tree’s tangled, trunk-like roots resemble human arteries and veins. For over five months Sean Cavana…

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For most of his career artist Russell Crotty was known for creating large drawings on massive globes. After years of working directly on the spheres to create astronomically inspired works, his shoulder started to hurt. He’d developed tendonitis, and something in his art had to change if he …

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Fine art has been a coveted tradition in Wyoming since Thomas Moran and Henry W. Elliot tagged along on the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871. Much of the art produced in Wyoming has focused on the unique ecology, geology and wildlife found in the state, but many well-regarded artists subvert…

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Artist David Frederick Riley recently left a painting outside to dry. When he returned he found a layer of water droplets covering his work from the unexpected snow melt from the deck above. He let the painting and its new coating of water dry. When he returned, he found the unplanned water …

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Andrew Shorts spent his childhood in Jackson Hole. It was where he learned to skateboard and ski and, as a teenager, became a promising professional skier on the freeride circuit. It was the place where he learned to paint and first garnered attention for his artwork from mentors and teacher…

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For Gunnar Tryggmo paintings are about capturing motion. The watercolorist wants to give viewers the sense that the bird they see in a painting might suddenly turn its head or fly away. He wants the viewer to feel the wind that makes the dry grass ripple in the work.

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For the sixth year in a row the National Wildlife Art Museum is opening up its selection process to the community at the Blacktail Gala. Although the event is dedicated to buying art for the museum’s permanent collection, it is also a chance for the creatives and donors to dress up, eat well…