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Dan Williams shows a dulcimer to Tyler and Camille Sutton, of Dallas, in July at his Tonewood Acoustic booth during Art Fair Jackson Hole at Miller Park. The 53rd annual fair continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Sunday at Miller Park.

New album up for grabs

Wyoming-raised Brent Moyer is dropping a new album Thursday at a CD release party and show scheduled to start at 7:30 p.m. at the Silver Dollar Showroom.

Now a Nashville, Tennessee, resident (he still spends summers in Jackson Hole), Moyer’s sound is described as blend of country and Americana. He shares the studio with several well-known Nashville artists on his 12-song album, “Doing Better Now,” including Joe Collins and John Hadley.

“Doing Better Now” can be picked up at Thursday’s release party or at Brent-Moyer.com. If you miss him on Thursday, you can catch him Aug. 14 and 15 at Dad’s Bar and Steakhouse at 283 N. Main in Thayne.

Legacy painter at Legacy

Phill Nethercott (heard of Nethercott Lane in Wilson? That’s his family) will be showing five of his large paintings as part of Legacy Gallery’s “Art Focus.” The exhibit opens Thursday, with a free “meet the artist” event from 3 to 5 p.m. Friday.

Nethercott, who may be best known for oil painted impressionistic landscapes, was prompted to pursue his passion for painting by local artists including Conrad Schwiering, John Clymer and Jim Wilcox. Later study of French impressionists and illustrative art also influenced his perspective and techniques on the canvas.

His work at Legacy showcases some scenes that may look familiar, including scapes of the Tetons, Sleeping Indian, South Park and some of the natural foliage of the region. The 40-inch by 80-inch works can be seen at Legacy Gallery through Aug. 18.

Art Fair returns

For the second time this summer, artists participating in Art Fair Jackson Hole will be ready to share their wares in Miller Park. Thought you saw it all in July? Forty-four artists that weren’t at the mid-July fair will be exhibiting this weekend.

Exhibitors will be set up from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and again from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

The fair also has the flavor of a festival, including entertainment options like live music and outdoor yoga. The Art Association has teamed up with other nonprofits, including Dancers’ Workshop, Grand Teton Music Festival, the National Museum of Wildlife Art and the Teton Raptor Center, to put on performances all weekend and offer free kids activities, including face painting and art activities.

Entrance to the fair costs $5 for one day those who are not Art Association members and is free for members (a three-day non-member pass can be purchased for $10). Entrance fees support Art Association education and outreach programs. Entrance for kids younger than 10 is free. 

Volunteers are still needed for the weekend, especially on Saturday afternoon. Those who put in a few hours earn free entry into the fair and other Art Association benefits.

One hot picnic at Astoria

Hoback Firefighters are hosting their 43rd annual fundraising picnic Saturday, an event that helps raise money for volunteers in training, equipment and community services.

The picnic begins at noon at Astoria Hot Springs Park. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $10 for kids ages 6 to 12 and are free for kiddos under 6.

Visit Facebook.com and search “Hoback Picnic” for more information.

Race cars — for art

Test your driving skills against your friends at the “Speed Trials Arcade,” a set of interactive driving simulators inspired by 1980s arcade games and designed by artist Josh Short.

The trials will be set up from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Teton Artlab. Find more information at Facebook.com; search “Speed Trials.”

— Melissa Cassutt and Julie Kukral

 

Scene Editor Billy Arnold covers arts and entertainment. He apprenticed as a sound engineer at the Beachland Ballroom in Cleveland, Ohio before making his way to Jackson, where he has become a low-key fan of country music.

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