Take off your hat and put your hand over your heart: The Grand Teton Music Festival Orchestra and the Utah Symphony Chorus will open Thursday’s Fourth of July concert with a “Star-Spangled Banner” that is sure to send chills.

Seats in Walk Festival Hall are already sold out for the annual Independence Day treat, but it will be broadcast throughout Teton Village commons, so anyone who chooses to celebrate the day at the resort will be able to hear patriotic favorites, from John Philip Sousa to John Williams, starting at 6 p.m.

“This is a concert we all know and love,” said Andrew Palmer Todd, the festival’s president and CEO. And while the festival can tinker with what it performs, he said “it’s not the time to overthink things.”

So while Runnicles and the band will add to the mix some favorite Americana like part of Ferde Grofe’s “Grand Canyon Suite” and Henri Vieuxtemps’ “American Souvenir” — pieces everyone might not know the title of, but everyone will recognize immediately — they also will of course hit the holiday’s high notes with “God Bless America,” the traditional “Armed Forces Salute,” “America the Beautiful” and hits from the Great American Songbook.

Also, to keep the Spirit of ’76 rolling, at 7 p.m. Wyoming Public Radio will broadcast last year’s performance on all of its member stations. For info call 733-1128 or visit GTMF.org. 

Contact Rich Anderson at 732-7062 or rich@jhnewsandguide.com.

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