Teton County voters will decide Nov. 6 whether to renew the lodging tax for another four years. The tax is a 2 percent charge on visitors’ hotel stays in Teton County.

After the tax is collected 60 percent of the revenue goes to local travel and tourism promotion. Thirty percent is reserved for visitor impact services like public transportation, pathways and public safety, and 10 percent is funneled into the general funds for the Town of Jackson and Teton County.

The 60 percent earmarked for promotion is distributed by the Jackson Hole Travel and Tourism Board, whose members are appointed by elected officials.

In fiscal year 2018 the board allocated $4.4 million in lodging tax revenues to promote fall, winter and spring tourism to Jackson Hole.

The largest chunk, $1.8 million, went toward destination marketing, like the “Stay Wild” ad campaign aiming to attract adventure seekers.

Another $764,00 funded community events, like Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s Rendezvous Festival, the SHIFT Festival and the AMSOIL SnoCross, and $721,600 funded visitor services through the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce.

Of the almost $2.2 million in lodging tax revenue funneled into town and county budgets in fiscal year 2018, about 39 percent went to START and public transportation, about 26 percent to parks and 19 percent to Fire/EMS and public safety.

After first approving the lodging tax in 1986 and again in 1990, Teton County voters ended the levy in 1994, rejecting it three more times before it was revived in 2010 and again in 2014.

Proponents of the tax say it provides a critical revenue source for government and mitigating tourism’s impacts, while critics say it promotes excessive tourism.

Two political action committees have formed aiming to sway voters.

We asked representatives of each PAC to provide the top three reasons voters should approve or reject renewing the lodging tax, see the boxes below.

Teton County voters will decide Nov. 6 whether to renew the lodging tax for another four years. The tax is a 2 percent charge on visitors’ hotel stays in Teton County.

After the tax is collected 60 percent of the revenue goes to local travel and tourism promotion. Thirty percent is reserved for visitor impact services like public transportation, pathways and public safety, and 10 percent is funneled into the general funds for the Town of Jackson and Teton County.

The 60 percent earmarked for promotion is distributed by the Jackson Hole Travel and Tourism Board, whose members are appointed by elected officials.

In fiscal year 2018 the board allocated $4.4 million in lodging tax revenues to promote fall, winter and spring tourism to Jackson Hole.

The largest chunk, $1.8 million, went toward destination marketing, like the “Stay Wild” ad campaign aiming to attract adventure seekers.

Another $764,00 funded community events, like Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s Rendezvous Festival, the SHIFT Festival and the AMSOIL SnoCross, and $721,600 funded visitor services through the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce.

Of the almost $2.2 million in lodging tax revenue funneled into town and county budgets in fiscal year 2018, about 39 percent went to START and public transportation, about 26 percent to parks and 19 percent to Fire/EMS and public safety.

After first approving the lodging tax in 1986 and again in 1990, Teton County voters ended the levy in 1994, rejecting it three more times before it was revived in 2010 and again in 2014.

Proponents of the tax say it provides a critical revenue source for government and mitigating tourism’s impacts, while critics say it promotes excessive tourism.

Two political action committees have formed aiming to sway voters.

We asked representatives of each PAC to provide the top three reasons voters should approve or reject renewing the lodging tax, see the boxes below.

Contact Allie Gross at 732-7063, county@jhnewsandguide.com or @JHNGcounty.

Allie Gross covers Teton County government. Originally from the Chicago area, she joined the News&Guide in 2017 after studying politics and Spanish at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

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