Jackson Hole Woman - Looking Back

Jackson businesswoman Clarene Law, shown here in 1991, was named Citizen of the Year by the Chamber of Commerce in 1974 and served seven consecutive terms in the Wyoming House of Representatives beginning in 1990. On the eve of her retirement from the Legislature she said, “I’ll never give up working.”

45 years ago …

Clarene Law, co-owner of the Ranger Steak House and the Antler Motel, was named Citizen of the Year at the Chamber of Commerce Harvest Ball and Annual Banquet.

Ann Smith, 16, achieved her first-degree black belt in the Moo Duk Kwan Soo Bak Do Tan Soo Do school of karate. Her father, Bob Smith, a second-degree black belt artist and instructor, conducted the exam.

Margaret Feuz, president of the Jackson Cowbelles, submitted the organization’s Recipe of the Month to the Jackson Hole Guide: Pickle Pot Roast.

Donna Premor was appointed dog officer for Jackson.

• At the St. John’s Auxiliary luncheon, President Kay King presented volunteers with pins for their various hours of work. In Nita Garaman’s case, it was more than 500 hours. Francis Scott had clocked the second-highest hourly total, with more than 300.

Women’s Lib hit the local Punt, Pass and Kick” contest, reported the Jackson Hole Guide. More than 70 Jackson boys and girls competed.

• First National Bank hosted the semiannual Wyoming group meeting of the National Association of Bank Women. The Jackson contingent included Betty Jones, Virginia Blair, Winnina Flower and Laurene Sinn of Jackson State Bank and Nancy Riddle of First National Bank.

• County librarian Meg Tallber read to preschoolers every Wednesday morning for storytime.

30 years ago …

• As the third annual Quilting in the Tetons began, Bertha Gillette, owner of the Quilt Shop in Victor, Idaho, recalled when the art was a necessity, not a hobby. She’d grown up on the Chambers homestead on what became the National Elk Refuge, and had started quilting at age 14. “We had nine kids, so every time a new baby came that meant a new quilt,” said Gillette, now 74.

Kathy Bressler’s clothing business, Cattle Kate, had grown in the eight years since she’d started making scarves for friends. She sold her merchandise to 400 stores around the country and had store displays in Japan, Germany and France.

Louise Bertschy was named Senior of the Year by Pioneer Homestead Senior Services. Her love affair with the Tetons began in 1927 when she was 13 — and then named Louise Mapes — and her family camped on the shore of Jenny Lake. At 75 she lived in a log home at Triangle X dude ranch, which she started with her first husband, John Turner.

15 years ago …

• On the eve of her retirement from the Wyoming House of Representatives, where she’d served seven consecutive terms since 1990, Clarene Law showed no signs of slowing down. “I don’t plan to retire at all,” said the CEO and board chairwoman of Elk Country Motels Inc. “I plan to spend more time with my family, but I’ll never give up working.”

• School board members fired Superintendent of Schools Sandee Oehring and installed Pam Shea, a principal with the district, as interim superintendent.

• An article in the News&Guide’s Working Women section (now named Jackson Hole Woman) asked, “Where are Jackson’s women leaders?” No women sat on the Jackson Town Council or the Teton County Board of County Commissioners. Lisa daCosta, a candidate in the recent primary for House District 23, said many women were busy with careers. “The county commission and the Town Council are not 10-hour-per-week jobs,” she said.

• Photographer Bronwyn Minton won a Wyoming Arts Council fellowship. It was the second time in four years she’d been awarded the $3,000 prize.

• In her first multisport race, Amy Fulwyler won the women’s title at the inaugural Jackson Hole Mountain Duathlon, which involved a 5-kilometer trail run and a 10-km mountain bike ride. Her combined time of 1 hour, 4 minutes and 50 seconds beat the second-place woman by nearly seven minutes.

— Jennifer Dorsey

45 years ago

Clarene Law, co-owner of the Ranger Steak House and the Antler Motel, was named Citizen of the Year at the Chamber of Commerce Harvest Ball and Annual Banquet. Her long list of civic activities included serving as committeewoman for the Republican Party, president of the Fine Arts Foundation and director of Provident Federal Savings and Loan.

Ann Smith, 16, achieved her first-degree black belt in the Moo Duk Kwan Soo Bak Do Tan Soo Do school of karate. Her father, Bob Smith, a second-degree black belt artist and instructor, conducted the exam.

Margaret Feuz, president of the Jackson Cowbelles, submitted the organization's Recipe of the Month to the Jackson Hole Guide: Pickle Pot Roast.

Donna Premor was appointed dog officer for Jackson.

At the St. John's Auxiliary luncheon, President Kay King presented volunteers with pins for their various hours of work. In Nita Garaman's case, it was more than 500 hours. Francis Scott had clocked the second-highest hourly total, with more than 300.

"Women's Lib hit the local Punt, Pass and Kick" contest, reported the Jackson Hole guide. More than 70 Jackson boys and girls competed.

First National Bank hosted the semiannual Wyoming group meeting of the National Association of Bank Women. The Jackson contingent included Betty Jones, Virginia Blair, Winnina Flower and Laurene Sinn of Jackson State Bank and Nancy Riddle of First National Bank.

County librarian Meg Tallbert read to preschoolers every Wednesday morning for storytime.

15 years ago

Jennifer Dorsey is chief copy editor and Business section coordinator. She worked in Washington, D.C., and Chicago before moving to the Tetons.

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